The Life and Gardens of Beatrix Farrand. A wonderful documentary, long overdue.

Beatrix Farrand, Landscape Gardener, and well-known Landscape Architect is a woman who has certainly left her mark on many landscapes around the country. If you admire Dumbarton Oaks, Beatrix designed this very special estate garden for the Bliss Family. This is a woman in landscape architecture that deserves to have her story told.

Beatrix Farrand, a truly unique visionary who forged her own path in Landscape Design

Karyl Evans took the time to actually document this story from Maine to California. Using interviews and footage of over 50 remaining gardens that Beatrix Farrand designed, we have a great story of her life. Beatrix started as a Landscape Gardener and by the end of her life, had become a highly respected Landscape Architect.

As an avid admirer of Beatrix Farrand, I had to seize the moment and attend this showing at Greenspring Gardens in Virginia. Karyl takes the viewer on a trip that gives us insight on how passionate Beatrix was for plant material and design. Beatrix Farrand’s finished landscapes had lots of color, form, heights, and texture.

Karyl Evans speaking to the attendees of her film on Beatrix Farrand at Greenspring Gardens, Virginia.

Karyl Evans placed us in the midst of some of the finest gardens that have survived the test of time. A documentary film has never existed about Beatrix Farrand. A six-time award-winning documentarian, Karyl has captured the story of a young woman who initially grew up in a well to do family. Beatrix Jones father was a well to do industrialist and her Mother was a Social Worker. The marriage was an unhappy one and unfortunately, her parents divorced. Beatrix had to figure out how to make a living to help support herself and her mother.

Employed by her Aunt Edith Wharton and mentored by Dr. Charles Sprague Sargent, Beatrix found herself doing quite well as a Landscape Gardener. With clients from coast to coast, Beatrix made a name for herself as she pursued this career. Not a traditional career choice for women, Beatrix Farrand excelled in Landscape architecture. A career that included being one of the Founders of the American Society of Landscape Architects. Conversations shared with Scholars like Diana Balmori, Landscape Historian Judith Tankard, and Shavaun Towers, Landscape Architect are peppered throughout the film. These conversations give a bit of information on how Beatrix Farrand is an integral part of the conversation on Landscape Architecture to this day.

This film can be purchased by clicking: http://www.beatrixfarranddocumentary.com

There is an opportunity to see this film at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC. On November 1, 2017, from 6:30 – 8:30. Karyl Evans will share this long overdue documentary called The Life and Gardens of Beatrix Farrand. Joining Karyl will be Darwina L.Neal, FASLA and Maureen Joseph, ASLA, National Park Service.

Tickets are $20.00 for non-members of the National Building Museum, $12.00 for Members and pre-registration is required.

Walk-ins will be allowed if there is room.

To purchase tickets click here:

http://go.nbm.org/site/Calendar/1848501233?view=Detail&id=122563

Earning a coveted award as Most Outstanding Director, Karyl Evans is someone to get to know as well. She is on the Speakers List for the Garden Club of America and has had a 30-year career in public television, producing historical documentaries. A Fellow at Yale and a degree in Horticulture/Landscape Architecture, Karyl Evans saw a need for this story to be shared. It is truly a labor of love.

Thank you to the Darwina L. Neal Cultural Landscape Fund for recognizing the need for programming like this. As a Garden Writer, I hope to see more programming like this. It will help encourage other women to consider the garden as a place of beauty as well as a career. Thank you, Karyl Evans, for pursuing – from Maine to California – the story of Beatrix Farrand and documenting it on film.

To find out about a quick trip I took to Bellefield click here

Click for more information on the National Building Museum 

 

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